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of trade, as well. yes, an ipad in china gets made and it's value point $50. but it's only about $20 of that that goes to china and the rest goes back to the u.s. we'll get into the dynamics of trade, as well, and how we measure it. we'll also be joined by the ilo director general, as well, guy rider. we'll hear from the head of the world intellectual property organization. so it's a big trade day here from geneva on "worldwide exchange." lots of great things to get into. and by the way, 157 members of the wto, shortly to be 158. kazakhstan today should get the approval, all 157 ambassadors are here. they will get approval later this afternoon. so an ever expanding membership base. >> kazakhstan being just the latest. plenty more from ross straight ahead on the program. in the meantime, we want to check in our how markets are doing. so much attention on italy. in particular, you can see the message broadly speaking this morning is in negative, we're seeing about a four to one outpacing decliners versus vapsers here. the stoxx 600 is down abo about .37%. let's take a look across the t
. >> very nice. >> all right. aside from that, we'll take a look at upbeat economic news out of china. the purchasing managers index rising to 50.9 in december. highest level since august. the surge also helped speculation the chinese government will take additional steps to support its economy. of the 15 times china's up 3%, since '09, s&p that day is up 13 times. almost every time. despite the futures today, is it a good omen for the markets here? >> look, there was a dichotomy in that government. there were people who were concerned about inflation. and there were people who said, listen, we're not growing fast enough. they do have a lot of levers. if they want to grow, i still -- i've been a bull on china. if they want to do 9%, 10%, they have the ability to do it. all they have to do is have a gigantic sewer infrastructure program. >> that's true. there's going to be an economic war conference held soon. it's believed the government will start to release growth forecast at that conference and perhaps unveil some further stimulus measures or tip their hat in terms of whether they
, not just in china, but also in the asean countries. >> the industry engineer -- the engineering industry is expecting high turnover. experts are optimistic the upward trend will continue next year. they are hoping the global demand will continue to keep the eurozone crisis at bay. >> to the markets. worries about the future of the german economy weighed on markets. we have this a bit from the frankfurt stock exchange. -- this update from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> the dax closed down at the highest level since five years, the day before. some profit-taking. shares have been dragged down by concerns that the german economy might cool down pretty soon. the ifo institute lowered its growth expectations for the german economy. the federal reserve seems to be quite pessimistic. looking at the u.s. economy, the fed thinks that the unemployment rate will stay very high next year. >> let's take a quick look at some market numbers. the dax closed at 7569. the euro stoxx 50 ended the day just a tad down. the dow jones is currently going down over 1/2 of 1%. >> hong fighting broke out in the
the results of that in around about 30 minutes. >>> and china and india secretary growth slowed in november. analysts say china and india's nonmanufacturing team expected to improve thanks to a hiring boost in the mainland as well as strong new orders in india. at the same time, china's new leadership, as we pointed out, has laid out some fresh directives. >> these are some pretty sweeping reforms making china's famously inefficient bureaucracy more efficient. it's an effort to "win the confidence and the support of the people" as public backlash rose against the special treatment of politicians. so a new list of dos and don't's for chinese leaders. on the do side, cut down on giving face. the art of extreme flattery or reverence, which results in some very long meetings and speeches. keep them short and cut down on the lavish feasts. he's also encouraging more travel to rural parts of the country where the real problems are. on the don't's side, stop the empty talk. in china, niceties are often more formal and exaggerated than west. another one is don't stop traffic. if you've ever been to
. the leaders of russia and china continue to support the assad government. delegates from those countries did not attend the meeting. >>> 20 years after the u.s. closed its last military base in the philippines, u.s. troops are out toeturn inorce. top officials from the two countries have agreed to expand the u.s. military presence in the south china sea. the goal is to serve as a counterbalance to any potential chinese ambitions in the region. u.s. assistant secretaries of state kirk campbell took part in talks with philippine officials on maritime security and cooperation. the united states is planning to send marine units, vessels, and warplanes to the philippines and expand the scope of the joint military exercises with the country. details on t exercis andhe location of the deployment have still got to be worked out. >> we want a different kind of relationship based on mutual respect and equal partnership and that is what we have sought to do over the course of our meetings today. >> one candidate site is palawan island is a candidate. analysts say u.s. forces will, in effect, will be st
daily gain in more than thee years ago china gets ready to chart its new economic plan. domestic demand is strong enough to keep the lid on growth. >>> european markets get a lift from the latest european market data showing the private sector has expanded for the first time since april and signaling europe could avoid a recession in q4. >>> and japan's business sentiment sours in the fourth quarter. this reading comes two days before a nationwide vote that suggests it will hand the ldp position a landslide win. >>> we're going to give you all the latest results from the flash december data for the pmi for the eurozone that we're just getting out. the overall, the deposit is a touch stronger for the month of december. the details show the manufacturing weakened slightly and its services strengthened slightly. they are overall still in negative territory. and we're seeing the euro/dollar respond a little bit to the downside. down about 0.01% trying to fight back into flat on the day. 130.75 is the level there. again, the services pmi is at 47.8. compared with the 47 that was expected. it
economies due to the european downturn and cooling ties with china. another negative factor is the drop in domestic car sales because state subsidies for buyers of fuel efficient cars expired in september. for the nonmanufacturing sector the sentiment index was down by four points from the previous surv survey. looking aahead the to the next three months, major manufacturers expect a slight improvement as they hope the u.s. and chinese economies recovery. they're concerned that cooling consumer sentiment will persist. japanese shoppers are spends less, and that's got retailers depress depressed. as tremendous to try get people to spend more some may fuel a price war. >> reporter: major supermarket chains have slashed t prices over the past three months on more than 350,000 products. >> translator: customers are become increasingly price conscious. we hope discounts on daily necessities will encourage them to visit more often and boost our sales. >> reporter: furniture manufacturers are opening a 10% to 40% discount on nearly 900 items. >> translator: consumer spending in the overall eco
with modest gains. europe holding onto gains and china up nearly 3% over night as shanghai catches a break. our road map begins with a $20 billion deal. freeport mcmoran getting into the energy business making two acquisitions. plains exploration and mcmoran exploration. >>> concerns over the u.s. economy as adp misses estimates. the blame goes to superstorm sandy. goldman says the party is officially over for gold. >> starbucks at an investors conference will add 1,500 stores in the u.s. over the next five years. wait until you hear what they said about china. >> a big day in media. pandora ceo joins us live later this morning as the stock fell nearly 20% on weak guidance and netflix signs a big exclusive with disney. how much are they having to pay up for that? >>> let's deal with this big deal. as i've been telling you we'll see a lot of big deals -- i was wrong. here we are. freeport mcmoran buying not one but two companies. the combined price if you add it all together gets close to $20 billion. that does include debt. let's go through some of the details. it's somewhat complex. let's
demand there, and exports to china fell 14.5%. chinese consumers are shying away from japanese goods due to ongoing territorial dispute. >>> japanese university students are busy trying to land a job in an economy that's not proving that welcoming. the japanese firms hire them en masse before they graduate. and third-year students started their job hunting in earnest this month. before most looked for jobs at big firms, but that may be changing. nhk world's shio tanaga tells us more. >> reporter: more than 100 students crowded into this recruitment seminar in tokyo. the company publishes free magazines an has only about 400 employees. until recently small firms such as this one often struggled to attract any students to seminars at this university. nami kitajima has been looking for sales work. she says she doesn't care about the size or fame of the company. >> translator: i'm not looking at how big the firm is. the issue is whether i can gro personally through the company. >> reporter: traditionally, most students have tried to land jobs at leading firms. the belief was that those compa
particularly the china pmi numbers and what we've seen from gdp recently that maybe some of the markets key to u.s. exporters may be showing signs of stabilizing, maybe get to growth. so that might mean moderation in the eurozone might ease in the first quarter. but again, this is all dependent on what happens with that ongoing debt crisis and any step back in resolving that would obviously have a knock-on effect to the economy. >> i'm wondering whether germany as we look at -- they're just above sort of recession territory at the moment. i'm wondering whether if they get better growth out of asia, that will offset the weakness that they're seeing in europe enough to keep them above the pencil line. >> what we've seen so far with today's numbers is exports are declining very sharp. they'll need asia and the u.s. to offset some of that demand weakness, but again, the biggest market for most is the euro zone. if the eurozone is performing badly, that will have a thok-on effect for those countries. >> there's a number of strategists saying after the u.s. has sort of led equities for most of th
. >> turmoil in italy. berlusconi throws his hat in the ring. retail sales numbers out of china, hoping the economy is in fact on an upswing. >> apple, enthusiasm. jeffreys trimming its price target to 800 from 900, as apple shares do trade lower in the pre-market. we'll start with mcdonald's, posting better than expected november same-store sales, global comps up 2.4. u.s. same-store sales up 2.5, offered by breakfast offerings, including that cheddar/bacon/onion sandwich, as melissa mentioned. jim? people are saying the u.s. maybe is making a turn here. >> i find mcdonald's is levered to new products, levered to menu technology. they do invent things. my hat's off to janet. they had this number last week. reminds people, again, they've been right down, and up. mcdonald's is one of those things where joe asked me from squawk when we were talking, i said, i think this is a for real term. if they continue to innovate. i may this may not be your cup of tea, burger, but innovation s higher. >> they tried to sell it to consumers as opposed to their extra value menu, which is a little bit hi
.s. has slapped duties on wind turbine towers on china on price its says were unfairly cheap. this comes as washington welcomes a high-level chinese delegation led by the vice premier. his team is in the u.s. to talk trade and economy. he's expected to meet with u.s. treasury secretary tim geithner tomorrow. wang is the first official from the new leadership team to visit with the u.s. for more on the impact and implications of this, let's speak with frank ching, adjunct associate professor at the chinese university of hong kong. frank, hi. the first news that we're getting out of this appears to be more import duties s. this going to be the theme of u.s./china relations, or do you expect these meetings to be more of a thaw? >> well, i think that these are the first meetings since the new leadership in china was installed. and since president obama saw -- well, won second term. i think both sides want to make use of this occasion to improve their relationship. so this joint annual meeting is a platform, and i think that they will probably be able to achieve some progress on issues of con
.s. in general is looking positive. and the u.s. is creating a lot more jobs. china is still positive in the fourth quarter. china is going to show a slow and steady improvement. so we need those. >> higher expectations stronger in the likes of taiwan, india and brazil. let's go back to where you say they're weakest. greece, italy, spain, the netherlands. this is a very weak feature, indeed. how bad in it? >> it's bad. the eurozone is the global economic problem now. if you look at asia where i just returned from, both countries are feeling optimistic. but they seem to be inwardly focused now by being a triangle of china, india, indonesia. we're not seeing a great benefit into europe as we did before. for instance, germany is looking pretty pessimistic. based on its lack of export performance to places like china. >> yeah. when the bundes bank came out and shortly downgraded forecasts, how is the employment picture? if you've got a relatively healthy china and the u.s. consumer bounce back, wouldn't that help germany? >> it certainly would. germany is relatively flat in terms of the e
stories of the year. and, why china set up shop in greece at the height of the euro crisis. but first, this "in the know" message. the euro crisis continued to remain a major concern for investors throughout the course of 2012. at the center of it all, greece. the country grappled with a need for bailouts with strings attached in the form of severe budget cuts that sparked protests from the people. however, the financial crisis in europe is providing an opportunity for china. earlier this year, we heard from new york times reporter liz alderman on a chinese shipping company that is making waves in greece. > > how successful has this shipping company, known as cosco, been so far in greece? > > it's an interesting story. this chinese basically state- run shipping company came in here about three years ago in a $500 million deal that ever since then has been a model for the country, because what they did is they bought half of piraeus port, which is an ancient port in greece and one of the most important ports in the southern mediterranean. what they did was they basically took an operat
china. thus providing exporters -- germany, japan, or china -- with the requisite demand necessary. so, the ever expanding trade deficit was not an accident. it was a very clever way of replacing one that surplus recycling system with another. the first one, it was one where america had a surplus and america decided instead of doing what germany is doing at the moment -- which is cutting its nose to spite its face, and thereby entering into recession by cutting, cutting, cutting -- volcker as the head of the fed had a different idea. we are going to expand our dominance and our wealth by expanding our deficit and using our deficits to provide the rest of the world with the demand which is necessary to grow their economies, even at the expense of ours. and who is going to pay for the deficit? if i have an ever-expanding deficit, the bank tells me it is game over. but if you are the united states of america and you have the reserve currency of the world, and certain other factors that i will touch upon later, what you can do is you can expand your deficit as long as you create the circum
, as of right now china owns $1.15 trillion of our debt. then, number two on the list, is japan with $1.13 trillion of our debt. now, this is interesting. out of this debt number three on the list is opec. opec is an entity. that's the countries of ecuador and venezuela and india and bahrain and iran and iraq and kuwait and amman and qatar and saudi arabia and the u.a.e., algeria, ga been a, -- gabon, nigeria. they're now number three on the list and they own $267 billion of our debt. brazil comes in at number four, $250.5 billion. and then number five on the list, new to the list, the top five list, the caribbean banking centers. now own $240.4 billion of u.s. debt. by the way, caribbean banking centers are the bahamas, bermuda, cayman islands, netherlands and panama. this is who owns us. this is who owns our debt. and this is why on this side of the aisle, what we continue to say is the spending has to be dealt with. we have seen -- we've heard from everybody. we are hearing from economists all around the globe. and they repeatedly say what we are saying, what we've been saying for ye
for the group. he was promoted second-in-command earlier this year. >>> back to the economy now, china apparently going on an american spending spree. a chinese company agreed to buy a big chunk of insurance giant aig for more than $4 billion after the company got a huge bailout during the u.s. financial crisis. that is not the only bargain that china is picking up from u.s. taxpayers lately. stuart varney on this morning, head of "varney & company" on fox business network. good morning, stuart. good to see you. >> good morning, martha. martha: they're gobbling up our assets in many ways . what do you make of it. >> they are spending the money they have got buying american assets cheap. you mentioned aig. a chinese company is paying $4 billion for aig's plane leasing business. aig remember got $189 billion as a bailout fund that was back in september of 2008. the taxpayers still are the largest shareholder in aig. we sold the plane leasing business to china cheap. second item, a 123 batteries, americans taxpayers gave that company $249 million in grants and another 250 million in tax s
up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on board with you because they fear your view. they think you do not favor going -- you favor going over the cliff. that's what they think. they think that you favor -- >> just for the record since we're on tv. that's silly if they think that they shouldn't be ceos. >> it doesn't really matter. that's what they think. >> i want you to walk me up to that moment. >> behind the record. i like that too. >> i'm stuck. li
a million reasons, well, it's a nokia phone, well, it's china. ipad miniis available. this is a stock that's so widely owned. it reminds me of sirius satellite. every doctor, every dentist owns apple. they don't know the price per share, they just know it is the proxy for the market. >> they just accelerated dividends. but i think we're talking now 150 companies in some fashion have accelerated or put forward a special dividend. you put forward a special market share, china is 76, with the market share at least. >> is it a disappointment that apple did not pay a special dividend? is that part of this? >> there was some of that. >> there was some expectation? not that they ever gave any voice to it. they never said a word about it. >> true. >> look, it is widely owned if the stock were -- it's obviously, here's the stock that went from 70 to 50, maybe it goes to 48, 45. everybody who doesn't know what apple is, other than the fact that they use an imac or iphone are selling it. and, look, if you're a hedge fund manager you went from thinking i have to own it, or i have to short it. . >> in
't an accord in congress. >> we will always have china. manufacturing pmi data from last night is the best in 21 months. can we finally say the chinese economy has been stabilized. >> but of course, we start in washington. as you know, congress comes back today. the house gaveling into session now with legislative business starting at 10:00 a.m. the senate returns at 11:00 a.m. eastern. there are only a few hours left to get a deal done. eamon? >> you're already hearing people talk the way they talk on new year's day. a lot of people wish they could go back in time and do things differently. that's the way people are talking in washington about this fiscal cliff. feeling as if this thing suddenly got off the rails. take a listen to mitch mcconnell last night talking about the pace of the negotiations here and the frustration that he's experienced going through all of this over the weekend. take a listen. >> now, i'm concerned about the lack of urgency here. like we all know we're running out of time. this is far too much at stake for political gamesmanship. we need to protect the american
.s. engineer who went to china and saw them building a dam. and china's o so interested in having jobs and job creation. and the u.s. engineer goes to china, and he sees them building a dam, and they're all using shovels. and the engineer asks the chinese engineer, why are they using shovels? why don't you have them use modern equipment? we're trying to create jobs. and so the british -- engineer says why don't you give them spoons? [laughter] all jobs are not the same. the idea that we somehow reduce spending or even if we reduce the growth of government spending which would be an important first step does not mean we're going to see retardation in growth levels. those people who actually do capital investment. so i've been arguing as kevin said on entitlement reform. the federal government spent $3.5 trillion last year. of that about 1.5 was social security, medicare and medicaid. three big government expenditure programs are about 45% of government expenditures. those are growing. in 2010 medicare and medicaid combined spent more than social security. social security is a $750 billion progr
. >> which might be a slightly better outturn. china seems to be back on track. is there anything in europe -- what's the tail risk at the moment? >> i think there's two things that could still go wrong in europe. one, there's always political risk. in italy, you do have elections coming up. there's a chance getting a higher share than people anticipate. but even then, the financial forces are going to force any government that comes into power to more or less stick to the plan morsi set out. on the other hand, there's always spain, the worries that with 25% unemployment, that you would see the default rate particularly on residential mortgages shoot up, it's 3% now, which is pretty amazing given the struggles within the economy, but we think it will go up somewhat, but really not any more than people have already priced in. >> and then ten year yields, 5.24%. at the moment, relatively speaking, pretty comfortable. >> maybe a little bit too comfortable and we certainly don't want to get complace complacent.yields are where they were say in march of this year and then subsequently they shot
to end the civil war in syria. now, remember, both russia and china have blocked u.n. attempts to force out the assad regime. now the russians say they are willing to meet with the syrian opposition. it could open the door for real u.n. action on the ground, action that could mean american involvement. we've got more details in a live report in just a minute. >>> but also, russia's president formally saying no to americans who want to adopt russian children. it is a heartbreaking development for hundreds of americans who are trying to adopt children from russian orphana orphanages. that is happening right now. president vladimir putin signed the adoption ban today. sadly, more than 50 americans who were in the final stages of adopting russian children, they are not going to be able to. and while those families certainly hoping that they're going to allow these adoptions to go through, the country's child rights commissioner says that those kids are going to stay in russia. so why are the russians doing this? the ban is considered a payback of sorts for an american law that was passed tw
quite good. it indicates that the economy in china is expanding again. that means that german companies can hope for new orders from china again, and the markets here can hope for new chinese money to be invested soon into german assets. >> let's take a quick look at some market numbers. the dax ended the day almost 1/2 of 1% up. the euro stoxx 50 closed up at 2582. the dow jones is currently going down about 1/4 of 1%. the euro is trading $1.3660. we turn our attention to syria, where the human cost of the civil war is not limited to loss and destruction inside the country. some half a million summer -- syrians are refugees in neighboring countries. >> for those studying abroad in europe, the anxiety about the safety of their loved ones can beat all consuming -- can be all-consuming. >> this man is torn between remaining where he is and returning to war-ravaged syria. he has been studying medicine in germany for five years and is now doing his residency. he is having trouble concentrating on his professional career. his family can no longer support him financially. that means he spends
in boosting inflation ultimately. the euro/dollar, 1.3221. so for trading in asia, just how japan, china and the rest have been affected by fiscal cliff news, diedra morris is join onning us with plenty more. hi. >> hey, kelly. it was a bit of a rude awaking. a lot of these indexes were on their way to gains and then we had the fiscal cliff setback. we had news that john boehner's plan b failed. this all turned red and this is where we ended. the nikkei 225 coming back from that huge rally that we have seen over the last five weeks shedding 1%. the exporters hurt here because the dollar/yen was lower. it has regained some ground in the last few hours or so. the kospi shedding about 1%. blame politicians in the u.s. and blame heavyweight samsung. this accounts for some 20% of market value on the kospi index. down 4%. that hurt the broader markets. this is, of course, because eu regulators are poised to excuse samsung of breaking competition rules and filing competition patent lawsuits against samsung. greater chinese markets, shanghai more isolated from global happenings and fiscal cliff
we already know about russia out china and there which brings us to the big question this week -- will the president's second term triumphs be abroad or here at home? >> i think his second term will be defined by foreign policy and looming confrontation over iran. chris: politco has spoken. >> despite all of the domestic issues, he will have a bigger role to play on the world stage and brought into that with events whether it be syria, iran. >> leadership just changed in china for the first time in 10 years, the most important economic relationship we have in the world and he's got to make headway there to make sure they stay on their reform path so they continue to grow and the world economy will be stronger. >> i agree, it's unanimous, the big foreign policy challenges are coming at him. he can't avoid them. he's got to deal with iran, he's got to deal with syria, he's got to deal with afghanistan. chris: do we have a chance with iran? everybody worries about this -- do we have a chance to stop them from nuclear weaponnizing? >> yes, the elements of the deal, what's called th
saw that. i do think one thing we can certainly say given that china seems to be stabilizing a bit, we can all discuss europe. greek situation. maybe it's off the front pages for a while. and so if we assume that the jobs picture in the u.s. is not bad, let's assume not bad, it puts even more of a focus on the fiscal cliff negotiations because it becomes even more binding one would assume in terms of good or bad for the market, for the economy. >> kernen had a good point. does strength mean the economy could handle a cliff or is it so good you wouldn't want to tamper -- >> if i wanted to create a recession, what would i do? i would raise everybody's rates. i would cut the unemployment benefit. just trying to think of a theory of how i could cause a recession. i would cut back government spending quickly. >> i would raise interest rates to 20%. >> bernanke ought to join the -- look, i think this is what's going to happen. i think it's 50-50 we get a deal. no vacation. no legislation, no vacation. i think that when people get their paycheck at the end of january, they are going to be sho
. if apple gets approval for the china mobile contract, and the television, the smart television which are both expected, anticipated this year, we're looking for earnings this coming year of $50. $50 times 14 is $700 price target. we have a $720 price target, bill. so we've put apple, qualcomm, microsoft, oracle, and your big club stocks. all of those have done well this year. the big winners of this month, the banks have come on super strong. china ma and japan. and i think you can start to nibble a little on china and japan, as well. >> michael, is there an argument to be made that you don't want to touch stocks right now until you have some clarity on this fiscal cliff? just in case we see a big sell-off? >> there is, but i'll argue, too, that you're talking about $600 billion being sucked out of the economy next year. the s&p made $20 trillion. while we are looking at the fiscal cliff countdown, there is another countdown to new all-year highs when the dow is close to the prior peak around 600% from here. investors should be looking overseas. you want to look where there is no fis
reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much of the world paused today to observe christmas. the day brought all the traditional rites of faith for christians and a new urgency to calls for calm in the troubled corners of the globe. thousands of the fait
obviously focus on is china. in september, they approved infrastructure projects. love the way the stocking is acting the last couple of days. dagen: you are bullish on the global economy. charles: for a while now. connell: you are not worried about china athol? charles: i think china is going to continue to be on a roll. i am also impressed with brazil, indonesia and turkey. the rest of the world really doing extraordinarily well. connell: we like when you go global on us, charles. what do you use, google maps or apple? charles: stuart varney is probably better than me when it comes to these smart phones. connell: i do remember when you got away from the flip phone. charles: that is only because i left it in the green room. i heard someone from the smithsonian came up. dagen: charles, thank you so much. connell: let's go to this google graphic story. it is a very popular app. let's put it that way. we will talk about that coming up. more from washington, the house speaker ready to put through his own legislation. >> our hope continues to be to reach an agreement with the president what we
have as in this for a while. i think there is always china, europe, and the congress that can miss this up. i think it is hard to stop this recovery. we have done everything we can to do it. we can do it again if we try hard. i think we will not succeed this time. >> we have not talked about the creation yet, which polling showed is a major concern for americans. for the long-term unemployed who have been left behind a little bit and then to the economic recovery, do you feel like the president and congress is doing enough to address the problem? what politically and realistically could be done in the next four years? >> i think the president is committed to this. i think he would like to see an extension of unemployment insurance. he would like to see it if possible an extension of the payroll tax cut. we just released a $4 trillion deficit revenue plan that calls for four and a billion dollars in short-term stimulus. we think there is a need for a infrastructure and roads and bridges. we think it has to happen sometime in the next 20 years. we have a situation with incredibly low
, americans take out insurance to rebuild their lives. but in china, no such luck. after beijing's worst downpour in decades washed out this home, he and his wife had to borrow $3100 in friends and relatives to rebuild, a small fortune on his meager salary. there's no such thing as homeowners insurance, he says. the industry here has been agreeing over the past decade, but still underdeveloped with private policies largely a foreign idea. in countries like the united states, homeowners insurance replaces pretty much whatever somebody owns. about you but here there is no such guarantees, so people are forced to salvage whatever they can on their own. as more chinese get richer, many are looking for ways two o prot their wealth and lives. >> people are some savings, a first car and all that, typically insurance product is actually a very good product for them. >> right now car insurance is popular. china is expected to become the second largest insurance market behind the u.s. by 2020. and the competition is fierce, still dominated by chinese players like picc. international insurers face
it varies by market. we saw significant growth in asia, particularly in china, double digit growth even though supply was growing fast. what we saw in europe and the u.s., we saw supply growth was restrained because there wasn't bank finance and there still isn't which means rev par is growing 6%, 7%, 8%. so it's been quite a strong market and total revenues have grown, as well. demand has grown, we've seen a robust business for the last three years and we've grown highway patrol ahead of the market which is something we try to do. >> i note that you're still expanding, as one would maybe anticipate now and asia is still a very important market. how much expansion are you doing there? >> well, the u.s. is our biggest market, about 60%. china is about 10% of our business. it's about 30% of our clients. for our companies, we have about 11% or 12% of the total pipeline in the world and effectively 30% of that is china. so china is now our second biggest market. is between -- let me get the years right. between '09 and '11, our business doubled there from $1 billion to $2 billion a year. it
vacuum cleaner. sucking into the united states the net exports of europe, japan, and lately china. thus providing exporters -- germany, japan, or china -- with the requisite demand necessary. to keep the factories going. so, the ever expanding trade deficit was not an accident. it was a very clever way of replacing one that surplus recycling system with another. the first one, it was one where america had a surplus and america decided instead of doing what germany is doing at the moment -- which is cutting its nose to spite its face, and thereby entering into recession by cutting, cutting, cutting -- volcker and kissinger initially, and then volcker as the head of the fed had a different idea. we are going to expand our dominance and our wealth by expanding our deficit and using our deficits to provide the rest of the world with the demand which is necessary to grow their economies, even at the expense of ours. and who is going to pay for the deficit? if i have an ever-expanding deficit, the bank tells me it is game over. but if you are the united states of america and you have the rese
before. foreign ministry officials met separately with envoys from japan, the united states, china and russia. it's believed they discussed ways to cancel the launch. the ships have technology to track missiles. they're also considering raising the country's alert status by one notch. >>> euro zone finance ministers approved a loan just last week. now the greeks have announced one way they will use the funds. what's the latest? >> one of the requirements for greek receiving the bailout fund is they cut down their debt. they will buy back government bonds a t a discount. greek officials said on monday they will purchase the bonds from private financial institutions. they will pay 30 to 40% of the original price before the bonds mature. the announcement came a week after euro zone finance ministers agreed to offer 43.7 billion euros. that's about $57 billion. greek officials said the critor institutions will receive bonds issued by the euro zone's bail out fund instead of cash. the buy back program is a condition leaders must fulfill to receive the next cash infusion. the success dep
on housing and employment data, the global economy continues fragile with the european debt crisis and china i in in. >> rogoff is a professor of public policy and economics at harvard, he is a coauthor of the best selling book, this time is different, eight centuries of financial folly, many consider it to be the authoritative text on the impact of financial crisis around the world. i am pleased to have ken rogoff back on this program. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: let me start big, if i may. so i mean, how do you see as we enter a new year the global economy? >> well, to state the obvious, everybody is growing more slowly than they would like to, if at all. europe is basically flat, the u.s. is improving, but it is not exactly galloping and, you know, we are entering probably a weak quarter where people are hoping it will be stronger over the course of the year, china is slowing some and in general all of the emerging markets are slower than they were most of them india has slowed dramatically, brazil is slow, so yes, indeed it is a fragile situation, when the u.s. is one of the
forces. itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today at the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s. allied countries, also called for swift international action to end the bloodshed in syria. in central asia, a military plane crashed early this morning in kazakhstan killin
on that point, the companies for stocks like tiffany's, what about aptitude in places like china in. >> overall when we see what's happening in china, so many new brands emerged in china, new companies on the luxury good fronts, and you've had the big conglomerates vogue down their rate and new store openings. watch profitability for luxury companies in 2013. >> okay. r.j., break it down. who do you like for next year? >> in addition to costco and amazon, i like some of the late cycle discretionary plays especially when we see the housing market improve, names like william sonoma and home depot, names that did a great job investing in the supply change, a name like american eagle stands out in that regard. those are probably our top picks heading into 2013. >> jay, what would you avoid? >> anything that's a commoditized retailer. you'll get killed by amazon and other low-cost providers, names like best buy, barnes & noble, any of the office guys. i think most of those names are dead in the water right now and definitely names to avoid at this point. >> dana, any names we missed from you? >> i t
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